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Kapsch Group
Press & Mediacenter

Press Contacts
Carolin Treichl

Executive Vice President Marketing & Communications
Kapsch Aktiengesellschaft
Am Europlatz 2, 1120 Vienna, Austria

+43 50 811 1710carolin.treichl@kapsch.net
29. October 2020
Kapsch TrafficCom Survey: 63 percent of Britons would leave their cars at home.

Corona alters transport patterns – experts advise grasping the opportunity London. October 29, 2020 – 63 percent of UK citizens are willing to limit car journeys to certain times in order to improve urban air quality. A vast majority of 81 percent are in favour of reducing traffic-related emissions by means of environment-friendly transport solutions. This was confirmed by the population-representative Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020 survey in March of this year. Although a broad theoretical consensus already existed among the population, practice during the Corona crisis is proving to be at odds with expectations: Passenger numbers on local public transport have fallen dramatically and switching to electric cars remains the exception. On the other hand, we are seeing a sharp increase in switching to bicycles and e-bikes. Mobility experts advise exploiting this window of opportunity to achieve the climate goals of the Paris Agreement by means of specific action. “Councils in at least 40 cities across the country have reacted swiftly during the pandemic and created more space for cyclists and pedestrians,” says Steve Parsons, Head of UK Sales Kapsch TrafficCom. “Cycle lanes have been widened and even new cycle routes have been set up in order to maintain social distancing. This has been a real success story, but it is only a question of time before the numbers of cars on the road increase again. And many people will continue to avoid public transport whenever they can because of the current COVID-19 situation.” Those responsible should therefore grasp the opportunity existing now to get things back on the right track. Digitally integrated systems have proven in practice to be very effective here. Mobility can be managed effectively throughout the year despite rising car traffic volumes and without letting CO2 emissions return to pre-crisis levels. Smart city Madrid shows how this can work. Madrid has already demonstrated how this is possible. In order to fundamentally reduce traffic jams and airborne pollutants, the Spanish capital has implemented an intelligent mobility system developed by Kapsch. “A system of adaptive traffic light management which automatically adjusts to reflect the current traffic situation is an important component of this solution,” explains Parsons. This alone has enabled jams to be reduced by approximately 20 percent and emissions by around ten percent. “With the use of anonymized vehicle data which are integrated into the traffic management network, we can have an even more free-flowing and therefore economically efficient traffic management.” To this end, Kapsch has added over 200 permanent traffic measurement units to the existing network capturing traffic data on Madrid’s road. Real-time traffic data are the key to further analyses and improvements. The Madrid authorities obtain an accurate overview of the current traffic situation based on comprehensive mobility data captured about pedestrians, cyclists, motorbike riders and car drivers. “These measurements are supplemented with data from other sources, such as local public transport providers and the police, before being integrated into and analysed by our EcoTrafiX™ software platform,” Parsons adds. “Not only can municipal authorities respond immediately to accidents and traffic jams; These data also allow the city to manage traffic flows and to continuously optimize urban mobility, including all modes of transport. This is beneficial to both people and the environment.”  

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22. October 2020
What Chilean cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 81% of Chileans see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Santiago de Chile. October 22, 2020 – 81 percent of Chilean citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 82 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While in Santiago a plan to reassign spaces for pedestrians and cyclists has been implemented in a busy downtown area, in Europe Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the “15-minute City”: Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept that makes social distancing possible on the streets,” says Emilio Rivas, Executive Vice President Sales of Kapsch TrafficCom for Latin America. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones, but it’s an approach for the long term that may take a long time to implement. There are intelligent transportation systems available today though, that are more effective to help keep traffic related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future. They can bring quick results while also laying the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is just shifted to other city routes, the positive impact won’t be noticeable,” explains Rivas. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management approach. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, it would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, government officials should focus on developing a strategy to make the best use of the possibilities provided by digitally connected mobility. Besides introducing driving bans for cars, it is also important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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22. October 2020
What Argentine cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 69% of Argentinians see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Buenos Aires. October 22, 2020 – 70 percent of Argentine citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 70 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While the city government in Buenos Aires started the construction of “pop-up” bike lanes on the capital’s two major avenues, in Europe Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept that makes social distancing possible on the streets,” says Emilio Rivas, Executive Vice President Sales of Kapsch TrafficCom for Latin America. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones, but it’s an approach for the long term that may take a long time to implement. There are intelligent transportation systems available today though, that are more effective to help keep traffic related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future. They can bring quick results while also laying the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is just shifted to other city routes, the positive impact won’t be noticeable,” explains Rivas. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management approach. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, it would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, government officials should focus on developing a strategy to make the best use of the possibilities provided by digitally connected mobility. Besides introducing driving bans for cars, it is also important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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22. October 2020
What Australian cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 69% of Australians citizens see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Melbourne. October 22, 2020 – 68 percent of Australians urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 64 percent believe noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. The common approach in Australia is on zero emission public transport and the creation of urban congestion zones. In Europe, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centres, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “Paris was quick to react to the pandemic, minimising the impact of COVID-19 with a new mobility concept that made social distancing easier,” says Matthew McLeish, Executive Vice President Asia-Pacific at Kapsch TrafficCom. “While many cornerstones of the 15-minute City concept are basically correct, it is also a very long-term approach. But as our survey shows, we need quicker wins to keep traffic-related emissions at the current levels, and to reduce them even further in the future. We can offer intelligent transportation systems today to reduce congestion. These solutions not only allow for immediate improvements. They also lay the basis for flexible and sustainable long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. The goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians is pursued by many future-oriented cities around the world. “But you do not achieve a significant impact by only shifting the traffic to other districts of the city. Cities need to adopt a holistic approach,” explains Matthew McLeish. That is why he recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management platform. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. This would reduce congestion times in cities by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “To take full advantage of the tremendous opportunities of digitally connected mobility, politicians should work with the authorities and suppliers to develop a comprehensive strategy. We have the tools and solutions to prolong people’s experience with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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15. October 2020
What Austrian cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 84% of Austrian citizens see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Vienna. October 15, 2020 – 89 percent of Austrian citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 84 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While city tolling is being discussed in Germany, other countries are opting for low emission zones. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept, making social distancing easier for the population,” says Gerd Gröbminger, Vice President Sales Kapsch TrafficCom. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones – but it is a very long-term approach that takes a long time to implement. In order to keep traffic-related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future, intelligent transportation systems are already available today. They enable quick improvements and, at the same time lay, the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is only shifted to other city districts through car-free zones, there is no significant impact,” explains Gröbminger. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing digitally connected mobility management. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, politicians should work with the authorities to develop a strategy that harnesses the opportunities of digitally connected mobility. Instead of introducing driving bans for cars, it is important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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15. October 2020
What Spanish cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 81% of Spanish citizens see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Madrid. October 15, 2020 – 80 percent of Spanish citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 82 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While Spain is gradually moving towards zero-emissions mobility, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “Paris has managed to react quickly to the pandemic with a new concept of mobility, facilitating social distancing for the population,” says Javier Aguirre, President of Kapsch TrafficCom for Spain and Portugal. “The concept of the 15-minute City is a good one, but it is a very long-term approach that needs a lot of time to be implemented. To keep traffic-related emissions at current levels and to reduce them even further in the future, intelligent transport systems are now available. They allow rapid improvements and at the same time lay the foundation for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if the main traffic only moves to other districts of the city, there is no significant impact,” explains Javier Aguirre. For this reason, he recommends introducing digitally connected mobility management. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “To be successful, politicians should work to develop a strategy that takes advantage of the opportunities of digitally connected mobility. Instead of introducing driving bans for cars, it is more important to holistically manage and thus improve people's mobility. There are intelligent solutions for cities that help to ensure cleaner air and less traffic in the post-Coronavirus era.”  

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15. October 2020
What UK cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 73% of UK citizens see quality of life as being impaired by emissions London. October 15, 2020 – 78 percent of UK citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 76 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. Councils in England are introducing clean air zones while, in Germany, city tolling is currently being discussed. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centres, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “It’s essential that cities react quickly in order to minimise the impact of COVID-19 and improve urban mobility”, says Steve Parsons, Head of Sales for UK & Ireland. “Many components of the 15-minute City are correct – but it is a long-term concept, and cities need quicker wins that will have an immediate impact. Intelligent transportation systems are already available today to reduce congestion, resulting in fewer emissions, less noise and improvements in air quality. By working together, we can lay the basis for sustainable improvements that truly benefit the health and social wellbeing of us all.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles. “But we cannot simply push the problem down the road. Instead, we have to adopt a holistic approach”, explains Parsons. That is why the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management platform. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “I want to once again stress that it is about us all working together – politicians, authorities, suppliers and the public – to develop a strategy that harnesses the tremendous opportunities of digitally connected mobility. We have the tools to prolong people’s experience with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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15. October 2020
What German cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Road traffic largest source of air pollution in cities according to WHO 83% of German citizens see quality of life as being impaired by emissions Berlin. October 15, 2020 – 88 percent of German citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 83 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While city tolling is being discussed in Germany, other countries are opting for low emission zones. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept, making social distancing easier for the population,” says Gerd Gröbminger, Vice President Sales Kapsch TrafficCom. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones – but it is a very long-term approach that takes a long time to implement. In order to keep traffic-related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future, intelligent transportation systems are already available today. They enable quick improvements and, at the same time lay, the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is only shifted to other city districts through car-free zones, there is no significant impact,” explains Gröbminger. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing digitally connected mobility management. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, politicians should work with the authorities to develop a strategy that harnesses the opportunities of digitally connected mobility. Instead of introducing driving bans for cars, it is important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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7. October 2020
Kapsch TrafficCom takes over tolltickets and regionally expands tolling services in Europe

Tolling services for trucks now available nationwide in six countries Compliance check for EETS-enabled on-board unit completed in Germany Vienna. October 7 th , 2020 – Kapsch TrafficCom acquired the remaining 35% interests in the German toll services provider tolltickets GmbH. Since July 2016, Kapsch has been holding a 65% stake in tolltickets. “With the combination of the unique experience of Kapsch TrafficCom as a pioneer and technology leader in electronic toll collection and the know-how of tolltickets in delivering tolling services, we have been paving the way for an interoperable tolling services offering across Europe for more than four years,” says Georg Kapsch, Chief Executive Officer of Kapsch TrafficCom. “Because of the high strategic importance of tolling services, we have decided to take over tolltickets completely. Our long-term goal is to establish ourselves among the leading EETS providers. Tolltickets will step-by-step expand its current portfolio to provide white-labeled tolling services for partner companies such as fleet card providers, vehicle manufacturers, or rental car companies.” Important compliance check in Germany completed In an important step forward on the way to expanding the services in Europe, tolltickets has successfully completed the so-called Compliance Checking Communication (CCC) in accordance with the specifications of the German Federal Office for Freight Transport (BAG). This confirms the prescribed functionality of the Kapsch on-board unit and clears the way for the following test phases. Passing these tests will ultimately allow Kapsch TrafficCom to offer toll services in Germany. Interoperable tolling solution for trucks now available nationwide in six European countries Kapsch TrafficCom and tolltickets are continuously expanding their services across the continent. A Western connection covering the entire highway networks in France, Spain and Portugal as well as some tunnels and bridges is now effective. In Central & Eastern Europe, tolltickets is the pioneer in providing tolling services for heavy-goods vehicles in Austria, Hungary and Bulgaria. The addition of Germany to this list would represent an important milestone on the way to providing full coverage of the corridors in Europe and delivering a unique customer experience. Other countries which are in preparation and available soon are Belgium, Norway, Denmark and Sweden. The European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) The European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) supplements the national electronic tolling systems of the member states and simplifies cross-border mobility for road users: Vehicles operating internationally no longer have to be equipped with a separate on-board unit (OBU) for each country, and only one contract with an EETS provider is needed. Kapsch TrafficCom is a globally renowned provider of transportation solutions for sustainable mobility. Innovative solutions in the application fields of tolling, tolling services, traffic management and demand management contribute to a healthy world without congestion. Kapsch has brought projects to fruition in more than 50 countries around the globe. With one-stop solutions, the company covers the entire value chain of customers, from components to design and implementation to the operation of systems. As part of the Kapsch Group and headquartered in Vienna, Kapsch TrafficCom has subsidiaries and branches in more than 30 countries. It has been listed in the Prime Market segment of the Vienna Stock Exchange since 2007 (ticker symbol: KTCG). In its 2019/20 financial year, around 5,100 employees generated revenues of EUR 731.2 million.

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