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Kapsch
Press & Mediacenter

Press Contacts
Carolin Treichl

Executive Vice President Marketing & Communications
Kapsch TrafficCom AG
Am Europlatz 2, 1120 Vienna, Austria

+43 50 811 1710carolin.treichl@kapsch.net
Sandra Bijelic

Head of Corporate Communications
Kapsch TrafficCom AG
Am Europlatz 2, 1120 Vienna, Austria

+43 50 811 1720sandra.bijelic@kapsch.net
23. October 2020
Impairments and adjustments of project margins weigh on earnings.

15:20 CEST The main result is a EUR 21 million impairment of goodwill. In addition, for some projects in particular in North America, the project margin had to be adjusted and provisions for impending losses had to be made in the first half of the financial year. This had a negative impact on the operating result (EBIT) in the amount of EUR 32 million. In addition, negative currency effects reduced the EBIT by EUR 6 million. As a result of these effects, revenues will amount to about EUR 258 million and EBIT to about EUR -58 million in the first half of the 2020/21 financial year. Consequently, the company currently expects a negative EBIT in the higher two-digit area as well as a year-on-year fall of revenues of about 25% for financial year 2020/21.

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22. October 2020
What Chilean cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Santiago de Chile. October 22, 2020 – 81 percent of Chilean citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 82 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While in Santiago a plan to reassign spaces for pedestrians and cyclists has been implemented in a busy downtown area, in Europe Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the “15-minute City”: Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept that makes social distancing possible on the streets,” says Emilio Rivas, Executive Vice President Sales of Kapsch TrafficCom for Latin America. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones, but it’s an approach for the long term that may take a long time to implement. There are intelligent transportation systems available today though, that are more effective to help keep traffic related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future. They can bring quick results while also laying the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is just shifted to other city routes, the positive impact won’t be noticeable,” explains Rivas. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management approach. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, it would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, government officials should focus on developing a strategy to make the best use of the possibilities provided by digitally connected mobility. Besides introducing driving bans for cars, it is also important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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22. October 2020
What Argentine cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Buenos Aires. October 22, 2020 – 70 percent of Argentine citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 70 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While the city government in Buenos Aires started the construction of “pop-up” bike lanes on the capital’s two major avenues, in Europe Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept that makes social distancing possible on the streets,” says Emilio Rivas, Executive Vice President Sales of Kapsch TrafficCom for Latin America. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones, but it’s an approach for the long term that may take a long time to implement. There are intelligent transportation systems available today though, that are more effective to help keep traffic related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future. They can bring quick results while also laying the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is just shifted to other city routes, the positive impact won’t be noticeable,” explains Rivas. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management approach. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, it would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, government officials should focus on developing a strategy to make the best use of the possibilities provided by digitally connected mobility. Besides introducing driving bans for cars, it is also important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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22. October 2020
What Australian cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Melbourne. October 22, 2020 – 68 percent of Australians urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 64 percent believe noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. The common approach in Australia is on zero emission public transport and the creation of urban congestion zones. In Europe, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centres, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “Paris was quick to react to the pandemic, minimising the impact of COVID-19 with a new mobility concept that made social distancing easier,” says Matthew McLeish, Executive Vice President Asia-Pacific at Kapsch TrafficCom. “While many cornerstones of the 15-minute City concept are basically correct, it is also a very long-term approach. But as our survey shows, we need quicker wins to keep traffic-related emissions at the current levels, and to reduce them even further in the future. We can offer intelligent transportation systems today to reduce congestion. These solutions not only allow for immediate improvements. They also lay the basis for flexible and sustainable long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. The goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians is pursued by many future-oriented cities around the world. “But you do not achieve a significant impact by only shifting the traffic to other districts of the city. Cities need to adopt a holistic approach,” explains Matthew McLeish. That is why he recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management platform. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. This would reduce congestion times in cities by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “To take full advantage of the tremendous opportunities of digitally connected mobility, politicians should work with the authorities and suppliers to develop a comprehensive strategy. We have the tools and solutions to prolong people’s experience with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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15. October 2020
What Austrian cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

89 Prozent der Österreicher wollen die Emissionen im Straßenverkehr dringend verringern.

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15. October 2020
What Spanish cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Madrid. October 15, 2020 – 80 percent of Spanish citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 82 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While Spain is gradually moving towards zero-emissions mobility, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “Paris has managed to react quickly to the pandemic with a new concept of mobility, facilitating social distancing for the population,” says Javier Aguirre, President of Kapsch TrafficCom for Spain and Portugal. “The concept of the 15-minute City is a good one, but it is a very long-term approach that needs a lot of time to be implemented. To keep traffic-related emissions at current levels and to reduce them even further in the future, intelligent transport systems are now available. They allow rapid improvements and at the same time lay the foundation for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if the main traffic only moves to other districts of the city, there is no significant impact,” explains Javier Aguirre. For this reason, he recommends introducing digitally connected mobility management. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “To be successful, politicians should work to develop a strategy that takes advantage of the opportunities of digitally connected mobility. Instead of introducing driving bans for cars, it is more important to holistically manage and thus improve people's mobility. There are intelligent solutions for cities that help to ensure cleaner air and less traffic in the post-Coronavirus era.”  

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15. October 2020
What UK cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

London. October 15, 2020 – 78 percent of UK citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 76 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. Councils in England are introducing clean air zones while, in Germany, city tolling is currently being discussed. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centres, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “It’s essential that cities react quickly in order to minimise the impact of COVID-19 and improve urban mobility”, says Steve Parsons, Head of Sales for UK & Ireland. “Many components of the 15-minute City are correct – but it is a long-term concept, and cities need quicker wins that will have an immediate impact. Intelligent transportation systems are already available today to reduce congestion, resulting in fewer emissions, less noise and improvements in air quality. By working together, we can lay the basis for sustainable improvements that truly benefit the health and social wellbeing of us all.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles. “But we cannot simply push the problem down the road. Instead, we have to adopt a holistic approach”, explains Parsons. That is why the expert recommends introducing a digitally connected mobility management platform. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “I want to once again stress that it is about us all working together – politicians, authorities, suppliers and the public – to develop a strategy that harnesses the tremendous opportunities of digitally connected mobility. We have the tools to prolong people’s experience with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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15. October 2020
What German cities can learn from the “15-minute City” Paris.

Berlin. October 15, 2020 – 88 percent of German citizens urgently want to reduce emissions from road traffic. 83 percent blame noise, air pollution and other burdens for health problems – these are findings of the representative survey “Kapsch TrafficCom Index 2020”. New concepts such as the “15-minute City“ in Paris point the way to prolonging people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times. The negative effects of road traffic have returned very quickly to the political agenda after the lockdown during the corona crisis. While city tolling is being discussed in Germany, other countries are opting for low emission zones. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pursuing nothing less than an urban planning revolution with her concept of the "15-minute City": Parisians should be able to reach everything they need for life from their doorstep within fifteen minutes on foot or by bike: grocery stores, health centers, schools, parks and workplaces. To make this possible, Hidalgo’s first step was to block central traffic routes for cars and convert them into bicycle expressways. What we can learn from the “15-minute City”. “The city of Paris has succeeded in reacting quickly to the corona crisis with a new mobility concept, making social distancing easier for the population,” says Gerd Gröbminger, Vice President Sales Kapsch TrafficCom. “The concept of the 15-minute City contains many important cornerstones – but it is a very long-term approach that takes a long time to implement. In order to keep traffic-related emissions at the current levels and further reduce them in the future, intelligent transportation systems are already available today. They enable quick improvements and, at the same time lay, the basis for flexible long-term changes.” Digital technology provides opportunities. Many future-oriented cities are pursuing the goal of clearing the streets for bicycles and pedestrians. “But if traffic is only shifted to other city districts through car-free zones, there is no significant impact,” explains Gröbminger. For this reason, the expert recommends introducing digitally connected mobility management. This includes, for example, traffic light control systems which automatically adapt to the current traffic situation. In pilot cities, this would reduce congestion times by up to 25 percent. The widespread use of SIM cards and vehicle-based GPS also makes it possible to capture and use real-time traffic data from all road users to manage mobility intelligently. “For quick success, politicians should work with the authorities to develop a strategy that harnesses the opportunities of digitally connected mobility. Instead of introducing driving bans for cars, it is important to holistically manage and improve people's mobility. There are smart city solutions available today to prolong people's experiences with cleaner air and less traffic in post-corona times.”  

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7. October 2020
Kapsch TrafficCom takes over tolltickets and regionally expands tolling services in Europe

Kapsch TrafficCom hat die verbliebenen 35 % der Anteile an der tolltickets GmbH, dem deutschen Anbieter von Mautdiensten übernommen.

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Kapsch TrafficCom Headquarters